Utopia - Netflix

Posted on Mon 18 June 2018 in netflix

Utopia - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: Dutch

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2014-01-06

Utopia - Dystopia - Netflix

A dystopia (from the Greek δυσ- “bad” and τόπος “place”; alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or simply anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening. It is translated as “not-good place” and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty. Dystopian societies appear in many artistic works, particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's 1984 and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization, tyrannical governments, environmental disaster, or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to real-world issues regarding society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science, or technology. However, some authors also use the term to refer to actually-existing societies, many of which are or have been totalitarian states, or societies in an advanced state of collapse and disintegration.

Utopia - Etymology - Netflix

Though several earlier usages are known, dystopia was deployed as an antonym for Utopia by J. S. Mill in one of his Parliamentary Speeches 1868 (Hansard Commons) by adding the prefix “dys” (Ancient Greek: δυσ- “bad”), reinterpreting the initial U as the prefix “eu” (Ancient Greek: ευ- “good”) instead of “ou” (Ancient Greek: οὐ “not”). It was used to denounce the government's Irish land policy: “It is, perhaps, too complimentary to call them Utopians, they ought rather to be called dys-topians, or caco-topians. What is commonly called Utopian is something too good to be practicable; but what they appear to favour is too bad to be practicable.” Decades before the first documented use of the word “dystopia” was “cacotopia” (using Ancient Greek: κακόs, “bad, wicked”) originally proposed in 1818 by Jeremy Bentham: “As a match for utopia (or the imagined seat of the best government) suppose a cacotopia (or the imagined seat of the worst government) discovered and described.” Though dystopia became the most popular term, cacotopia finds occasional use, for example by Anthony Burgess, author of A Clockwork Orange, who said it was a better fit for Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four because “it sounds worse than dystopia”. Some scholars, such as Gregory Claeys and Lyman Tower Sargent, make certain distinctions between typical synonyms of dystopias. For example, Claeys and Sargent define literary dystopias as societies imagined as substantially worse than the contemporaneous society in which the author writes, whereas anti-utopias function as criticisms of attempts to implement various concepts of utopia.

Utopia - References - Netflix