Say Yes to the Dress: Northern Edition - Netflix

Posted on Tue 04 June 2019 in netflix

At Amanda-Lina's Bridal Boutique, a team of consultants and stylists work to make brides' dreams come true, but between tantrums, criticism and opinionated entourages, it's never a simple task. In each episode of Say Yes to the Dress Northern Edition viewers witness firsthand the drama that comes with saying "yes'' to a dress. In charge of it all is shop owner Rachelle Pollari, who offers her great eye for fashion, as well as a welcoming hospitality. Assisting the brides with their search for the dream dress is stylist Joseph Spencer.

Say Yes to the Dress: Northern Edition - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2017-04-15

Say Yes to the Dress: Northern Edition - Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation - Netflix

The Crimean peninsula was annexed from Ukraine by the Russian Federation in February–March 2014. Since then, it has been administered as two Russian federal subjects—the Republic of Crimea and the federal city of Sevastopol. The annexation was accompanied by a military intervention by Russia in Crimea that took place in the aftermath of the 2014 Ukrainian revolution and was part of wider unrest across southern and eastern Ukraine. On 22–23 February 2014, Russian President Vladimir Putin convened an all-night meeting with security services chiefs to discuss the extrication of deposed Ukrainian President, Viktor Yanukovych. At the end of the meeting Putin remarked that “we must start working on returning Crimea to Russia”. On 23 February, pro-Russian demonstrations were held in the Crimean city of Sevastopol. On 27 February masked Russian troops without insignia took over the Supreme Council (parliament) of Crimea, and captured strategic sites across Crimea, which led to the installation of the pro-Russian Aksyonov government in Crimea, the conducting of the Crimean status referendum and the declaration of Crimea's independence on 16 March 2014. Russia formally incorporated Crimea as two federal subjects of the Russian Federation with effect from 18 March 2014. Ukraine and many world leaders condemned the annexation and consider it to be a violation of international law and Russian-signed agreements safeguarding territorial integrity of Ukraine, including the Belavezha Accords establishing the Commonwealth of Independent States in 1991, the Helsinki Accords, the Budapest Memorandum on Security Assurances of 1994 and the Treaty on friendship, cooperation and partnership between the Russian Federation and Ukraine. It led to the other members of the then G8 suspending Russia from the group, then introducing the first round of sanctions against the country. The United Nations General Assembly also rejected the vote and annexation, adopting a non-binding resolution affirming the “territorial integrity of Ukraine within its internationally recognised borders”. The UN resolution also “underscores that the referendum having no validity, cannot form the basis for any alteration of the status of [Crimea]” and calls upon all States and international organizations not to recognize or to imply the recognition of Russia's annexation. In 2016, UN General Assembly reaffirmed non-recognition of the annexation and condemned “the temporary occupation of part of the territory of Ukraine—the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol”. The Russian Federation opposes the “annexation” label, with Putin defending the referendum as complying with the principle of self-determination of peoples. In July 2015, Russian prime minister Dmitry Medvedev said that Crimea had been fully integrated into Russia.

Say Yes to the Dress: Northern Edition - Ukrainian response - Netflix

Immediately after the treaty of accession was signed in March, the Ukrainian Ministry of Foreign Affairs summoned the Provisional Principal of Russia in Ukraine to present note verbale of protest against Russia's recognition of the Republic of Crimea and its subsequent annexation. Two days later, the Verkhovna Rada condemned the treaty and called Russia's actions “a gross violation of international law”. The Rada called on the international community to avoid recognition of the “so-called Republic of Crimea” or the annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol by Russia as new federal subjects. On 15 April 2014, the Verkhovna Rada declared the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol to be under “provisional occupation” by the Russian military and imposed travel restrictions on Ukrainians visiting Crimea. The territories were also deemed “inalienable parts of Ukraine” subject to Ukrainian law. Among other things, the special law approved by the Rada restricted foreign citizens' movements to and from the Crimean Peninsula and forbade certain types of entrepreneurship. The law also forbade activity of government bodies formed in violation of Ukrainian law and designated their acts as null and void. The law had little to no actual effect in Crimea itself due to the mutual non-recognition between Kiev and Simferopol. Ukrainian authorities greatly reduced the volume of water flowing into Crimea via the North Crimean Canal due to huge debt for water supplied in previous year, threatening the viability of the peninsula's agricultural crops, which are heavily dependent on irrigation. The Ukrainian National Council for TV and Radio Broadcasting has instructed all cable operators on 11 March to stop transmitting a number of Russian channels, including the international versions of the main state-controlled stations, Rossiya-1, Channel One and NTV, as well as news channel Rossiya-cable operators on. They said that this is because of Russian media showing them in a negative light. In March 2014, activists began organising flash mobs in supermarkets to urge customers not to buy Russian goods and to boycott Russian gas stations, banks, and concerts. In April 2014, some cinemas in Kiev, Lviv, and Odessa began shunning Russian films. On 2 December 2014, the Ministry of Information Policy was created with one of its goals being, according to first Minister of Information, Yuriy Stets, to counteract “Russian information aggression”. In December 2014, Ukraine halted all train and bus services to Crimea. On 16 September 2015 the Ukrainian parliament voted for the law that sets 20 February 2014 as the official date of the Russian temporary occupation of Crimean peninsula. On 7 October 2015 the President of Ukraine signed the law into force. The Ministry of Temporarily Occupied Territories and IDPs was established by Ukrainian government on 20 April 2016 to manage occupied parts of Donetsk, Luhansk and Crimea regions affected by Russian military intervention of 2014.

Say Yes to the Dress: Northern Edition - References - Netflix