Ketonen & Myllyrinne - Netflix

Posted on Tue 30 October 2018 in netflix

Ketonen & Myllyrinne is a Finnish sketch series.

Ketonen & Myllyrinne - Netflix

Type: Variety

Languages: Finnish

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2006-10-08

Ketonen & Myllyrinne - Culture of Finland - Netflix

The culture of Finland combines indigenous heritage, as represented for example by the country's Uralic national language Finnish and the sauna, with common Nordic, and European culture. Because of its history and geographic location Finland has been influenced by the adjacent areas, various Finnic and Baltic peoples as well as the former dominant powers of Sweden and Russia. Finnish culture may be seen to build upon the relatively ascetic environmental realities, traditional livelihoods and a heritage of egalitarianism, (see e.g.: Everyman's right and universal suffrage) and the traditionally widespread ideal of self-sufficiency (see, e.g.: the predominant rural life but also more modern manifestations of such a life in the summer cottage). There are still cultural differences between Finland's regions, especially minor differences in accents and vocabulary. Minorities, some of which have a status recognised by the state, such as the Sami, Swedish-speaking Finns, Romani, Jews, and Tatar, maintain their own cultural characteristics. Many Finns are emotionally connected to the countryside and nature, as large-scale urbanisation is a relatively recent phenomenon.

Ketonen & Myllyrinne - Historical main aspects - Netflix

From 1100 to 1200, the crown of Sweden started to incorporate Finland. However, Novgorod also attempted to gain control. Several wars were fought between Sweden and Novgorod and later Muscovy and Russia between 1400 and 1700. In 1721, the Nystad Peace Treaty was signed ending Swedish dominance in the Baltic region. In 1809, Finland was annexed by Russia. From 1809 to 1917, Finland was a Grand Duchy with the Russian Czar as the constitutional monarch. Karelia, where most of the Russo-Swedish conflicts occurred, was influenced by both cultures though mostly it remained peripheral to both epicentres of power. The verses in the Kalevala originate mainly from Karelia and Ingria. The 19th century brought a feeling of national Romanticism and Nationalism throughout Europe. Finland's nationalism also grew where cultural identity and control of their land became a priority. Expression of Finnish identity by the University docent, A. I. Arwidsson (1791–1858), became an often quoted Fennoman credo: “Swedes we are not, Russians we do not want to become, let us therefore be Finns.” Nationalism heightened and resulted in a declaration of independence from Russia on December 6, 1917, Finnish Independence Day. Notably, nationalists did not consider the Swedish-speakers members of a different (Swedish) nation; in fact, many Fennomans came from Swedish-speaking families.

Following the recession of the Scandinavian ice sheet, which covered most of northern Europe, from Great Britain to Moscow, around 8000 BC, people began arriving in what is today Finland, presumably mainly from the south and east although recent archaeological finds reveal a presence of the north-western Komsa culture in north Finland equally old to the earliest finds on the Norwegian coast. The area of Finland belonged to the northeastern Kunda culture until around 5000 BC and Comb Ceramic culture from about 4200–2000 BC. The Kiukainen culture on the southwestern coast of Finland showed around 1200 BC.

Ketonen & Myllyrinne - References - Netflix