Jesus: Rise to Power - Netflix

Posted on Wed 05 June 2019 in netflix

It may just be the biggest political move in human history. The story of a power struggle that saw a small Jewish sect take over the most powerful empire the world had ever seen. Dr Michael Scott is unraveling this epic human drama filled with suspense, political intrigue, brutal religious persecution and sheer luck.

Jesus: Rise to Power - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2013-03-28

Jesus: Rise to Power - Judaism's view of Jesus - Netflix

Among followers of Judaism, Jesus is viewed as having been the most influential, and consequently, the most damaging of all false messiahs. However, since the traditional Jewish belief is that the messiah has not yet come and the Messianic Age is not yet present, the total rejection of Jesus as either messiah or deity has never been a central issue for Judaism. Judaism has never accepted any of the claimed fulfillments of prophecy that Christianity attributes to Jesus. Judaism also forbids the worship of a person as a form of idolatry, since the central belief of Judaism is the absolute unity and singularity of God. Jewish eschatology holds that the coming of the Messiah will be associated with a specific series of events that have not yet occurred, including the return of Jews to their homeland and the rebuilding of The Temple, a Messianic Age of peace and understanding during which “the knowledge of God” fills the earth." And since Jews believe that none of these events occurred during the lifetime of Jesus (nor have they occurred afterwards), he was not the Messiah. Traditional views of Jesus have been mostly negative (see: Toledot Yeshu), an account that portrays Jesus as an impostor, although in the Middle Ages Judah Halevi and Maimonides viewed Jesus as an important preparatory figure for a future universal ethical monotheism of the Messianic Age. Some modern Jewish thinkers have sympathetically speculated that the historical Jesus may have been closer to Judaism than either the Gospels or traditional Jewish accounts would indicate, starting in the 18th century with the Orthodox Jacob Emden and the reformer Moses Mendelssohn. This view is still espoused by some.

Jesus: Rise to Power - Toledot Yeshu - Netflix

In the Toledot Yeshu (for translation, see: Toledot Yeshu (translation)), the name of Yeshu is taken to mean yimach shemo. In all cases of its use, the references are to Yeshu are associated with acts or behaviour that are seen as leading Jews away from Judaism to minuth (a term usually translated as “heresy” or “apostasy”). Historically, the portrayals of a Jesus in the Talmud, Jewish literature were used as an excuse for anti-Jewish sentiments.

Jesus: Rise to Power - References - Netflix