Gangsters: Americas Most Evil - Netflix

Posted on Thu 27 June 2019 in netflix

Gangsters: America's Most Evil is a cinematic documentary series that explores the rise and fall of some of the most nefarious and notorious criminals brought to justice by the United States government. When Hollywood wants a jarring story about high-profile criminals, fictional tales are never as juicy as the true stories of the most notorious criminals brought to justice by the U.S. government. Take the example of Demetrius and Terry Flenory who founded the nefarious, multi-million dollar organization Black Mafia Family (BMF) with ties to the entertainment industry via BMF Entertainment which backed rappers including Young Jeezy. More recently, the story of the Black Mafia Family has attracted rapper and actor 50 Cent who is developing a movie based on the shady organization's history. Then there's Cheng Chui Ping (Sister Ping) whose story received big-screen treatment in 2014's Revenge of the Green Dragons which was executive produced by Hollywood heavyweight Martin Scorsese. The movie tells the true story of the Snakeheads, an international human smuggling gang, and features a character based on renowned smuggler Sister Ping. From thugs to lethal beauties, outlaws to kingpins, each episode profiles these gangsters and reveals their ominous motives and the circumstances that eventually led to their downfall. The premiere episode on Tuesday, January 19 features a storyline that reads like a movie script for a blockbuster crime thriller. James Spencer Springette, known as "Jimmy the Juice", went from selling juice to tourists on the island of St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands to distributing thousands of kilos of cocaine into the United States. Find out how he found himself on the FBI's top ten list of most wanted fugitives right next to Osama bin Laden.

Gangsters: Americas Most Evil - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-07-20

Gangsters: Americas Most Evil - Evil eye - Netflix

The evil eye is a curse or legend believed to be cast by a malevolent glare, usually given to a person when they are unaware. Many cultures believe that receiving the evil eye will cause misfortune or injury. Talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called “evil eyes”. The idea expressed by the term causes many different cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, primarily in West Asia. The idea appears multiple times in Jewish rabbinic literature. It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations with eye-like symbols known as nazars, which are used to repel the evil eye, are a common sight across Armenia, Albania, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon, Turkey, Israel, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Palestine, Morocco, southern Spain, Italy, Greece, the Levant, Afghanistan, Syria, and Mexico, and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists.

Gangsters: Americas Most Evil - Brazil - Netflix

Brazilians generally will associate mal-olhado, mau-olhado (“act of giving a bad look”) or olho gordo (“fat eye” i.e. “gluttonous eye”) with envy or jealousy on domestic and garden plants (that, after months or years of health and beauty, will suddenly weaken, wither and die, with no apparent signs of pest, after the visitation of a certain friend or relative), attractive hair and less often economic or romantic success and family harmony. Unlike in most cultures mal-olhado is not seen to be something that risks young babies. “Pagans” or non-baptized children are instead assumed to be at risk from bruxas (witches), that have malignant intention themselves rather than just mal-olhado. It probably reflects the Galician folktales about the meigas or Portuguese magas, (witches), as Colonial Brazil was primarily settled by Portuguese people, in numbers greater than all Europeans to settle pre-independence United States. Those bruxas are interpreted to have taken the form of moths, often very dark, that disturb children at night and take away their energy. For that reason, Christian Brazilians often have amulets in the form of crucifixes around, beside or inside beds where children sleep. Nevertheless, older children, especially boys, that fulfill the cultural ideals of behaving extremely well (for example, having no problems whatsoever in eating well a great variety of foods, being obedient and respectful toward adults, kind, polite, studious, and demonstrating no bad blood with other children or their siblings) who unexpectedly turn into problematic adolescents or adults (for example lacking good health habits, extreme laziness or lacking motivation towards their life goals, having eating disorders, or being prone to delinquency), are said to have been victims of mal-olhado coming from parents of children whose behavior was not as admirable. Amulets that protect against mal-olhado tend to be generally resistant, mildly to strongly toxic and dark plants in specific and strategic places of a garden or the entry to a house. Those include comigo-ninguém-pode (“against-me-nobody-cans”), Dieffenbachia (the dumbcane), espada-de-são-jorge (“St. George's sword”), Sansevieria trifasciata (the snake plant or mother-in-law's tongue) and guiné (“Guinea”), among various other names, Petiveria alliacea (the guinea henweed). For those lacking in space or wanting to “sanitize” specific places, they may all be planted together in a single sete ervas (“seven [lucky] herbs”) pot, that will also include arruda (common rue), pimenteira (Capsicum annuum), manjericão (basil) and alecrim (rosemary). (Though the last four ones should not be used for their common culinary purposes by humans.) Other popular amulets against evil eye include: the use of mirrors, on the outside of your home's front door, or also inside your home facing your front door; an elephant figurine with its back to the front door; and coarse salt, placed in specific places at home.

Gangsters: Americas Most Evil - References - Netflix